See your nutritional health in a daily bar graph with SuperTracker

ChooseMyPlate.gov's SuperTracker Website allows users to input their food and activity information to create nutritional and exercise goals. it provides users with a comprehensive report on their nutrition and links to information regarding the individual's daily habits

The SuperTracker at ChooseMyPlate provides comprehensive reports on a user’s nutritional needs and successes.

No, calorie counting is not my thing.

I just posted about it. But while researching for that post, I found the SuperTracker at ChooseMyPlate.gov and the curiosity was too much.

All of a sudden I have a profile and I’m entering my breakfast information.

But it’s amazing! And soooooooo much more than a calorie counter.

I set any 5 goals from 5 categories: weight managment, physical activity, calories, food groups and nutrients. Daily, I get to watch a graph display my progress on each goal, and when I succeed at one, I get an email.

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We need both mothers and fathers.

young girl swings from her parents' arms, but the father character has been painted over in white so that only the mother and daughter are visible while the father figure is vacant in the photo

(photo compliments of dailymail.co.uk)

Of the people I know, I can tell you who has been raised without a father, or a mother, or in a home victim to divorce, without having ever asked the person.

The people in the above categories exhibit similar behaviors and conduct their lives similarly.

We frequently hear about women with “daddy problems” who grow up without father figures. These women seek male attention in all of the wrong ways and participate in risky behavior. People say, Oh haha! Her daddy didn’t hug her enough as a child! But any person missing either a mother figure or father figure is starved of essential information in life, and have problems maintaining healthy relationships forever.

I recently read, “Like Father, Like Son, and, Yes, Like Daughter” by Molly B. Koch in Baltimore’s Child. It’s a good read about the importance of father figures.

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Television: the new parent for our children.

Bar graph illustrating the increase in the number of televisions per household from 1975 to 2010. In 1970, almost all households had one television. In 2010, a strong majority of households have 3 or more televisions.

(photo compliments of marketingprofs.com)

While lounging on the beach at Ocean City, MD, a woman vacationing with her family mentioned she had been on the beach every day while her husband and two sons spent the time inside the water-front hotel room on the boardwalk (a premium location) playing video games and sleeping.

Anyone else find that odd?

You pay for a room for a week in a city with dozens upon dozens of awesome outdoor activities, and the family stays inside, absorbed in screens?

On a similar note, does anyone find it the slightest bit odd that living/family rooms are designed around the television?

What happened?

Health, parenting, and social responsibility: Read “10 Bad Eating Habits Parents Often Teach their Kids” by Suzanne Cullen

(photo courtesy of AuPair.org)

I found a must-read article about the bad eating habits that parents pass on to their children. It addresses the responsibility of adults to be good influences on children, issues of health, and good daily habits.

Suzanne Cullen’s blog at AuPair.org features helpful articles about parenting and being responsible when influencing children.

After all, children are our most powerful legacy. We want to raise a wonderful generation of children who will be conservation-conscious, healthy, intelligent, responsible, and beneficial human beings. Right?

I highly recommend the blog at AuPair.org.

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Television is evil and it’s rotting your brain

back of kid's head as he faces a large snowy television screen taking up the whole photo

(photo compliments of civin.org)

I stand firm for a movement against screen-run lives. Technology is taking over my life.

In my goals, I noted that “tv=evil.” Let’s extend that to all screens: phones, video games, computers, tablets, iPods. (Yes, I understand the irony of blogging this information.)

Reasons to war against excessive media use:

  • You sleep best when it’s dark, don’t you? Who needs to mess with an already erratic sleep schedule by staring at a bright light after sunset?
  • Ever noticed that when someone’s eyes are glued to a screen, it’s challenging to call them into the real world? It’s annoying and rude. Let’s not be those people. Two more reasons

Goal: Stop being a big ball of flab and get healthy

a list: health goals: vitamins, 8 glasses water, whole grains, nuts, dairy, fruits & veggies, green tea, etc. 1 sweet daily, get. off. butt., wholesome food shopping, tv=evil, anti-screen movement, search for budget-friendly, anti-screen entertainment, ideas, body products: chemicals v. budgets, health apps

This list serves as a reminder and inspiration. It was created during a late-night brainstorming session.

What have I been up to?

Very recently, the answer would be: feeling like a lazy lump of blubber.

I usually focus on how society and other people should change, but let’s be honest: I need to start with myself. (No, this does not mean that you are off the hook.)

What does this list mean to you?

I’ll be posting about healthy eating habits, roundabout methods of getting my butt out of bed/the couch/the chair, ways to shop efficiently for all of the above, and sources where I find supporting information.

How is this pertinent to the blog’s theme of social responsibility?

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Women are objects.

close up of woman's chest wearing a dress with a deep-v cut to her navel. lots of breast showing.

This woman is oiled up and barely covered on the cover of Cosmopolitan magazine.

The objectification of women? Media and men catch the blame for this one.

Media

The last time I walked down a magazine aisle, the magazines edited by and targeted for females had scantily-clad, made-up and exposed women on their covers. And they are the most successfully sold.

Do media present us with images that we adopt, or do media present us with images that we demand and reinforce? Do we expect a company to tank to avoid objectifying women?

Men

Plus, men are always blamed. It’s always men that objectify women. Walk around. Women are hanging all out there. You think people (not just horny men) aren’t going to look?

Women are responsible for objectifying themselves.

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