Your health is a social responsibility

This blog is about social responsibility and I post a lot about health.

Maybe you think I’ve slipped off track, but I want to set the record straight.

I recently started following Blindfold on Facebook. I do not, (repeat) do not endorse all of their messages or sources, but the following three (specific) concepts really appealed to me.

photograph of a dinner table place setting: knife, fork, plate and one large half-yellow, half-white medicinal capsule in the middle of the plate. a quote frames the picture: "People are fed by the Food Industry which pays no attention to health, and are treated by the Health Industry, which pays no attention to food." said Wendell Berry

(photo compliments of facebook.com/b1indfold)

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Let’s be honest and just slap a skull and crossbones on your skin products.

neon green sticker with a cartoon face making a sickly expression. around the face reads "poison help! 1-800-222-1222.

Put this sticker on your ammonia and your face wash bottles. (photo compliments of enviroblog.org)

What’s your largest organ? *insert dirty joke*

The title might give it away, but it’s your skin.

It’s the pretty stuff. The barrier to the harsh outside world. It gives, gives, gives. And we take, take, take.

We want to eat healthy. We want to be fit. We want hearty immune systems.

Well then why would we just slather poisonous chemicals that inebriate our pretty, hard-working skin?

Have you tried to read your face cream, lotion, body scrub or shampoo label? I imagine mad scientists hunched over smoldering beakers of chemicals cackling about the scientific names of them. But we digress. Continue reading

Feeling sluggish, grumpy, unhealthy? Blame the toxic waste in your body.

(Image courtesy of http://www.thisnext.com/)

Another semester has started, and that means that “free time” is a phrase long gone from my vocabulary. I’m struggling to find time for the “health” aspect of my life, and after the third week of this hectic schedule, I’m feeling worn down and worn out.

Then I stumbled on Mark Hyman‘s article, “Is there toxic waste in your body?

Regarding the title, the answer for everyone is yes.

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“The health of millions of women around the world is threatened by irresponsible men”

In his article, “The Female Condom: Effective and Underused,” Dr. Jon LaPook discusses the rampant spread of HIV and STIs due to an irresponsible lack of use of condoms. His emphasis is on the development and use of the female condom because most people don’t even know that one exists.

I wish we lived in a pre-HIV world, but we don’t.

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You’re trying to avoid H1N1, but what’s in that hand sanitizer?

GoodGuide is thinking about your health and your hands. We all know it’s important to keep your hands clean in order to stay healthy through this winter and flu season (or you’d better learn quick), but if you’re using hand sanitizer to replace a tradition soap-and-water method or between hand washings, you need to check out this slide show.

hand_sanitizer_slideshow_ingredients

(Image courtesy of GoodGuide.com)

Washing your hands a lot to avoid flu doesn’t have to dry them out

With healthy and moisturized hands, you may be able to hold the world.

You can show your healthy and moisturized hands to the world without fear this flu season. (Image courtesy of http://flan.csusb.edu/)

During a visit to my dermatologist today (to have my severely dry hands checked), I learned that you don’t have to (and really shouldn’t) wash the backs of your hands with harsh soaps in order to remove the germs from your hands. Most things that you touch are with the palms and sides of your hands and fingers.

So you can save the delicate and thinner skin on the backs of your hands and stay protected against germs like those that cause swine flu.

That being said, please wash those important germ-transmitting palms and fingers thoroughly with soap and hot water, scrubbing for at least 20 seconds to kill the germs.

Noted also in the dermatologist visit was that using a bit of lotion on your hands after every washing is best. She also recommended buying hand soaps that are for sensitive skin, that say they contain moisturizers, and that have no scent or dies in them.

I’m going hunting for such a hand soap and lotion today. I’m thinking about trying the Health Concern in Towson first, then I may check Trader Joe’s and Target’s organic/natural body products section may carry something good and inexpensive.

I’d appreciate any suggestions, too.

Happy hive fives and hand shakes!

If you don’t want the flu, wash your hands.

A sign in the lobby of the Administration Building on Towson University's campus.

A sign in the lobby of the Administration Building on Towson University's campus.

And the award for best opening sentence about avoiding the flu goes to WVNS’s recent news story: “The power to stop the flu virus from spreading is literally in your hands.”

I could never have said it better. Beyond each of us having the power to end the spread of swine flu, it is almost as simple as washing your hands.

On a white board in Van Bokkelin, a building on Towson University’s campus, someone wrote “Washing your hands 4 times daily reduces chances of disease transmission 6-fold.” And now there are multiple hand sanitizer dispensers per floor of most campus buildings.

Think about it. You  wash your hands after you use the bathroom and before and after you prepare food (at least I hope this is an already-established minimum). But think about your daily activities: How many door knobs do you touch? What about all of those papers that have been through ten other pairs of hands? The phones? The keyboards? The counters? The desks? The dishes? The coffee pot? A pen? How many hands do you shake or high-five? How many times a day do you sneeze? Or brush hair out of your face? Wipe the corner of your mouth? Itch your eye? Itch your nose? I could go on, but the above list is tedious enough.

The point is that your hands are everywhere and they usually end up back around your face. The best way to catch a disease is by touching something and then putting it near your nose, eyes or mouth. So keep those digits clean to avoid getting sick in these dangerous swine-flu times.

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